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March 11 2018

transacid
15:44

lessadjectivesmoreverbs:

The Houses of Prickly Mountain, Part 1: David Sellers, Tack House, 1966

Named for its shape, which comes to one of Sellers’ signature sharp points and pricks the sky, this was the first house of the Prickly Mountain era. As the original case study, it was built with no blueprints beyond a rough sketch of the foundation — and with Sellers and his classmate Bill Rienecke acting as client, developer, architect, and contractor. Stairs appeared where they made sense, Plexiglas formed windows that conformed to the curves and angles of the walls, and cast-off materials became aesthetic focal points.

Not without its quirks (like a refrigerator jutting outside through the wall) and ultra-high stairs that have been known to trip people up, it was the beginning of the design/build movement. One of the defining characteristics of the design/build movement is the way structures grow organically. Sinks are shaped to fit their environment; Plexiglas windows curve based on need. Interiors follow the same sensibility, and the space becomes an aesthetic hodgepodge. Exteriors showcase the inventive geometry that dominates homes on Prickly Mountain. Inside, a staircase twists and turns with abnormally large steps to get from below to above.

See the full series here.

Text and images by Collective Quarterly, via Sight Unseen

(via awe-arch)

Reposted frompennarsson pennarsson viasofias sofias

March 02 2018

transacid
16:02
8390 65b8
Reposted fromkaiee kaiee viaMeeresbraut Meeresbraut

February 10 2018

transacid
20:45

soup.io

soup.io provides the most diverse feed on the internet for me. from shitposts to normie stuff over political opinions in all variations and memes in all variations to porn in all variations, ... anything is here and it's fucking glorious! i don't know how big this community really is but there's always enough content to browse here for hours every day - especially in the friends-of-friends feed and if the spam would go away of course in /everyone.

over the time i've seen a few people pointing out how this site provides a one of a kind experience, since nobody can recommend an honest alternative - which is always asked for, when the site went down again.

i really want soup.io to continue and fix its bugs (from failed youtube embedding to internal server errors and whatnot) but from the looks of it the soup•up model didn't quite work. my guess is, because the paying options are pretty limited. personally, i'm already patron to many projects and content creators but therefore almost everybody gets only 1€ per month, which sadly isn't an option for soup. a one time 200€ donation is out of the question and in general i am skeptical of the efficiency of one-time-donations anyway.

why not simply go on patreon and let people pay what they want and can afford? there surely must be a lot of people who are willing to throw in a buck or two, like me? or if there's any problem with that site in particular, just adapt the soup•up model to include more paying options?

i don't know but i fear the day soup.io goes offline and never on again ;_;

@kitchen @updates @elpollodiablo
Reposted fromshikaji shikaji viastarbug starbug

January 29 2018

transacid
19:42
3175 54d6 500
Reposted frombootlegs bootlegs viasofias sofias

January 18 2018

transacid
19:55
6672 9b84
Reposted frommahiaslsan mahiaslsan viasofias sofias

March 11 2018

transacid
15:44

lessadjectivesmoreverbs:

The Houses of Prickly Mountain, Part 1: David Sellers, Tack House, 1966

Named for its shape, which comes to one of Sellers’ signature sharp points and pricks the sky, this was the first house of the Prickly Mountain era. As the original case study, it was built with no blueprints beyond a rough sketch of the foundation — and with Sellers and his classmate Bill Rienecke acting as client, developer, architect, and contractor. Stairs appeared where they made sense, Plexiglas formed windows that conformed to the curves and angles of the walls, and cast-off materials became aesthetic focal points.

Not without its quirks (like a refrigerator jutting outside through the wall) and ultra-high stairs that have been known to trip people up, it was the beginning of the design/build movement. One of the defining characteristics of the design/build movement is the way structures grow organically. Sinks are shaped to fit their environment; Plexiglas windows curve based on need. Interiors follow the same sensibility, and the space becomes an aesthetic hodgepodge. Exteriors showcase the inventive geometry that dominates homes on Prickly Mountain. Inside, a staircase twists and turns with abnormally large steps to get from below to above.

See the full series here.

Text and images by Collective Quarterly, via Sight Unseen

(via awe-arch)

Reposted frompennarsson pennarsson viasofias sofias

March 02 2018

transacid
16:02
8390 65b8
Reposted fromkaiee kaiee viaMeeresbraut Meeresbraut

February 10 2018

transacid
20:45

soup.io

soup.io provides the most diverse feed on the internet for me. from shitposts to normie stuff over political opinions in all variations and memes in all variations to porn in all variations, ... anything is here and it's fucking glorious! i don't know how big this community really is but there's always enough content to browse here for hours every day - especially in the friends-of-friends feed and if the spam would go away of course in /everyone.

over the time i've seen a few people pointing out how this site provides a one of a kind experience, since nobody can recommend an honest alternative - which is always asked for, when the site went down again.

i really want soup.io to continue and fix its bugs (from failed youtube embedding to internal server errors and whatnot) but from the looks of it the soup•up model didn't quite work. my guess is, because the paying options are pretty limited. personally, i'm already patron to many projects and content creators but therefore almost everybody gets only 1€ per month, which sadly isn't an option for soup. a one time 200€ donation is out of the question and in general i am skeptical of the efficiency of one-time-donations anyway.

why not simply go on patreon and let people pay what they want and can afford? there surely must be a lot of people who are willing to throw in a buck or two, like me? or if there's any problem with that site in particular, just adapt the soup•up model to include more paying options?

i don't know but i fear the day soup.io goes offline and never on again ;_;

@kitchen @updates @elpollodiablo
Reposted fromshikaji shikaji viastarbug starbug

January 29 2018

transacid
19:42
3175 54d6 500
Reposted frombootlegs bootlegs viasofias sofias

March 11 2018

transacid
15:44

lessadjectivesmoreverbs:

The Houses of Prickly Mountain, Part 1: David Sellers, Tack House, 1966

Named for its shape, which comes to one of Sellers’ signature sharp points and pricks the sky, this was the first house of the Prickly Mountain era. As the original case study, it was built with no blueprints beyond a rough sketch of the foundation — and with Sellers and his classmate Bill Rienecke acting as client, developer, architect, and contractor. Stairs appeared where they made sense, Plexiglas formed windows that conformed to the curves and angles of the walls, and cast-off materials became aesthetic focal points.

Not without its quirks (like a refrigerator jutting outside through the wall) and ultra-high stairs that have been known to trip people up, it was the beginning of the design/build movement. One of the defining characteristics of the design/build movement is the way structures grow organically. Sinks are shaped to fit their environment; Plexiglas windows curve based on need. Interiors follow the same sensibility, and the space becomes an aesthetic hodgepodge. Exteriors showcase the inventive geometry that dominates homes on Prickly Mountain. Inside, a staircase twists and turns with abnormally large steps to get from below to above.

See the full series here.

Text and images by Collective Quarterly, via Sight Unseen

(via awe-arch)

Reposted frompennarsson pennarsson viasofias sofias

March 02 2018

transacid
16:02
8390 65b8
Reposted fromkaiee kaiee viaMeeresbraut Meeresbraut

February 10 2018

transacid
20:45

soup.io

soup.io provides the most diverse feed on the internet for me. from shitposts to normie stuff over political opinions in all variations and memes in all variations to porn in all variations, ... anything is here and it's fucking glorious! i don't know how big this community really is but there's always enough content to browse here for hours every day - especially in the friends-of-friends feed and if the spam would go away of course in /everyone.

over the time i've seen a few people pointing out how this site provides a one of a kind experience, since nobody can recommend an honest alternative - which is always asked for, when the site went down again.

i really want soup.io to continue and fix its bugs (from failed youtube embedding to internal server errors and whatnot) but from the looks of it the soup•up model didn't quite work. my guess is, because the paying options are pretty limited. personally, i'm already patron to many projects and content creators but therefore almost everybody gets only 1€ per month, which sadly isn't an option for soup. a one time 200€ donation is out of the question and in general i am skeptical of the efficiency of one-time-donations anyway.

why not simply go on patreon and let people pay what they want and can afford? there surely must be a lot of people who are willing to throw in a buck or two, like me? or if there's any problem with that site in particular, just adapt the soup•up model to include more paying options?

i don't know but i fear the day soup.io goes offline and never on again ;_;

@kitchen @updates @elpollodiablo
Reposted fromshikaji shikaji viastarbug starbug

March 11 2018

transacid
15:44

lessadjectivesmoreverbs:

The Houses of Prickly Mountain, Part 1: David Sellers, Tack House, 1966

Named for its shape, which comes to one of Sellers’ signature sharp points and pricks the sky, this was the first house of the Prickly Mountain era. As the original case study, it was built with no blueprints beyond a rough sketch of the foundation — and with Sellers and his classmate Bill Rienecke acting as client, developer, architect, and contractor. Stairs appeared where they made sense, Plexiglas formed windows that conformed to the curves and angles of the walls, and cast-off materials became aesthetic focal points.

Not without its quirks (like a refrigerator jutting outside through the wall) and ultra-high stairs that have been known to trip people up, it was the beginning of the design/build movement. One of the defining characteristics of the design/build movement is the way structures grow organically. Sinks are shaped to fit their environment; Plexiglas windows curve based on need. Interiors follow the same sensibility, and the space becomes an aesthetic hodgepodge. Exteriors showcase the inventive geometry that dominates homes on Prickly Mountain. Inside, a staircase twists and turns with abnormally large steps to get from below to above.

See the full series here.

Text and images by Collective Quarterly, via Sight Unseen

(via awe-arch)

Reposted frompennarsson pennarsson viasofias sofias

March 02 2018

transacid
16:02
8390 65b8
Reposted fromkaiee kaiee viaMeeresbraut Meeresbraut

March 11 2018

transacid
15:44

lessadjectivesmoreverbs:

The Houses of Prickly Mountain, Part 1: David Sellers, Tack House, 1966

Named for its shape, which comes to one of Sellers’ signature sharp points and pricks the sky, this was the first house of the Prickly Mountain era. As the original case study, it was built with no blueprints beyond a rough sketch of the foundation — and with Sellers and his classmate Bill Rienecke acting as client, developer, architect, and contractor. Stairs appeared where they made sense, Plexiglas formed windows that conformed to the curves and angles of the walls, and cast-off materials became aesthetic focal points.

Not without its quirks (like a refrigerator jutting outside through the wall) and ultra-high stairs that have been known to trip people up, it was the beginning of the design/build movement. One of the defining characteristics of the design/build movement is the way structures grow organically. Sinks are shaped to fit their environment; Plexiglas windows curve based on need. Interiors follow the same sensibility, and the space becomes an aesthetic hodgepodge. Exteriors showcase the inventive geometry that dominates homes on Prickly Mountain. Inside, a staircase twists and turns with abnormally large steps to get from below to above.

See the full series here.

Text and images by Collective Quarterly, via Sight Unseen

(via awe-arch)

Reposted frompennarsson pennarsson viasofias sofias
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